Honoring Student Leaders: Our 2014 Annual Meeting Recognition Awards

The Land Conservancy of Will County is again honoring Will County High School and Middle School students this year, at our 2014 Annual Meeting on Sunday, March 30th at CD and Me, in Frankfort, IL.  Any individual student, or a group of students, working on behalf of conservation are eligible for a cash prize of $250. Conservation projects could include habitat restoration efforts, installing a bird-or-wildlife friendly landscape in a public setting, constructing, monitoring or inspecting bluebird boxes, or analyzing available community open space or creek quality. Please help spread the word to area school groups, scout leaders, or any committed student you work with in conservation.   Our deadline for this competition is March 21st, and details are included on the link, below.  Call or email our office for more detail. Thank you. Details of our award and the cash prize are attached here:...
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Our 2014 Annual Meeting

Remember the fun and great energy at 2014’s Annual Meeting in New Lenox, IL? SAVE THE DATE:  Join us on Sunday, March 20th for the Land Conservancy’s 2016 Spring Luncheon. The Land Conservancy of Will County was thinking spring, with an inspiring gathering of members and friends. On Sunday, 3/30/14, from 4:00 – 6:00 p.m. we hosted our Annual Meeting at the beautiful CD and Me in Frankfort, IL. Our event speaker was Marcus de la fleur, a landscape architect and creative conservationist working to advance green solutions for our landscapes and our homes. Marcus will be speaking about his award-winning project, “One Drop at a Time, new resourceful paradigms at 168 Elm Ave.”  Please check out the amazing photographs and concepts of his work at www.delafleur.com/168_Elm/ You’ll leave this presentation with real-world examples of more sustainable and gorgeous landscape treatments and ideas for integrating green practices into your smaller urban home or large rural property. Our Annual Meeting also included conservation awards to area students and schools, silent auction items, delicious food from Parmesans, with time for networking and learning from our conservation-minded friends and...
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Conservation Currents, LCWC’s FALL 2013 Newsletter

Click on the links below for a read of our most recent newsletter, mailed mid-November to members, supporters and other conservation partners. otp_Land Conservancy News Fall 13 (Page 01) otp_Land Conservancy News Fall 13 (Page 02)  ...
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Prescribed Burn of easement prairie and other land restoration efforts

LCWC Board members, staff and volunteers conduct a prescribed burn in April, 2013 at our conservation easement, Palomino Trace, in Green Garden Township, Will County. This slice of permanently protected land along Forked Creek was seeded three years ago, and this past spring provided our first chance to burn the maturing prairie. Managing a prairie is surprisingly fun… AND it take a lot of work. From burns to brush removal to seeding to herbiciding, the Land Conservancy of Will County is working on it all, and welcomes your volunteer help.  Please email or call us if you are interested in donating your time and effort....
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Why work for land protection?

The Land Conservancy works throughout the County, but as a nearly all-volunteer organization, it helps to focus our land protection areas in targeted watersheds where the need is most urgent.  We are currently targeting outreach to landowners in Thorn Creek, Forked Creek and Jackson Creek Watersheds. This photograph shows the tangible value our outreach work will yield when private land protection efforts are part of the mix of land conservation, complementing the good work done by public agencies, such as the Forest Preserve District of Will County or the Illinois’ Nature Preserves Commission. Many smaller or less strategically-placed lands fall outside of the scope of these agency’s large land protection efforts.  However, a land conservancy such as ours can help fill the gap and provide important, additional value.   Incredible value, in fact, when considering this picture, above.   It was taken by Molly Hacker, and shows the rare plant, Shining Ladies Tresses (Spirantes lucida), growing on a small private land parcel, near Thorn Creek Nature Preserve.    Thankfully, these landowners are conservation-minded, and this plant’s presence was documented and reported to the Plants of Concern program at the Chicago Botanic Garden. Remarkably –  according to Swink and Wilhelm’s Plants of the Chicago Region (1994), this plant has not been seen in Will County since 1897.  A rare and beautiful find. Thank you, Molly Hacker, for the photograph.  Someday soon, smaller and not-so-small private parcels holding these unique and very rare plants, will have permanent...
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